When the 2016 referendum results were declared in favour of ‘leave’ by 52:48 percent of votes. But, it was not a win. The game had to be played out and it was not just a toss of a coin. Three-plus years on, the game had gone into double overtime and penalty kicks; the newish leader of the Tory party called the UK’s third general election since 2015 – and the first to be held in December for almost 100 years. There was no need for VAR; the results were clear and the Tories won with more seats and a bigger majority: they would have the mandate to push ahead with Brexit.

But, the game was again not over and now we had to go into another game, with a clear deadline: Brexit Day was January 31. It started the clock that runs out on December 31. But, this ‘transition’ period is not set in stone, and the government has indicated that it may walk away from negotiations at end-June. Well, that would leave things clear for the summer sports, like Wimbledon and Euro 2020 football, which starts on June 12. Trust me, the focus of the average Brit will have gone on holidays by then.

So, still, the victory is not truly won; it’s still pyrrhic, ie the victor has to wonder what he/she has really gained. That’s clear from the amount of political carnage that appears to still be going on. Who will be left standing by year-end?