Jamaica has some of the nicest people you could ever wish to meet. Not only nice, but also great at what they do. 

My blogger friend, Emma Lewis, and I were at the University of Technology last week for a two-day workshop on Multimedia Journalism, taught by Prof. Seth Gitner of Syracuse University, and co-hosted by UTech and the US Embassy in Kingston. More in that later. One of things discussed had been ‘moments’. Of course, many moments just occur and we’re not ready for them. 

We ended day one and were waiting outside the Engineering Department for rides. Taxis were passing by, but Emma was struggling to get through to a taxi company that would not answer its phones.๐Ÿ˜ Lightning was overhead, so we decided to go back inside to wait. (We noticed that none of the 20 or so students sitting under the trees budged an inch.) At the same time, we bumped into a tall man, with a crate full of bagged fruit, which he was selling inside the building. Curious, I asked if this was his regular thing. Yes, and mentioned that ‘the company’ (not named) was just down the road. 

A bag of fruit was a doorway to good service

Whether it was because the workshop had been about visual story telling or just from doing this so often, I took a quick picture, as I often do–capturing a moment. I picked up on a few other things.

His hair was covered with a net, as would be that of a kitchen worker. Hygiene 101 passed. He spoke softly and clearly. Once Emma was excited at the mention of naseberry and decided to try a bagful, he offered her one. He tested the naseberry and decided it was too soft, so pulled another bag. It fell to the ground. He grabbed it up and said “I can’t give you that one!” We looked a bit surprised. He pulled another and told her the price, $100, for two pieces of fruit. Guinea, papaya, orange. He pointed out that the oranges were wrapped in tissue to stop the juice seeping into the bag. Each bag came with a napkin-wrapped plastic fork. She was happy. But, what an example of customer service!๐Ÿ˜Š๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿพ๐Ÿ‡ฏ๐Ÿ‡ฒ

Care. Smiles. Deportment. Engagement. 

He told us his name was Shomari, though we might not have the spelling right. I wish you well, young man, and hope that all those you connect with get the same good service and impression. 

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