As far as I know, how the winner of Miss Universe is decided is not stated. So let’s not waste time speculating about why any Miss won and other Misses missed. So, transparent it is not.

The fan vote helps decide which Miss makes it to the final 15. Many people assume that the series of questions and answers before the final decision matter a lot. Various contestants have said that this isn’t so. It’s more likely that a bunch of opinions get squished together and out of the sausage machine pops the winner and the runners-up.

Immediate audience reactions made clear that naming Miss Jamaica as 4th runner-up, or 5th, was immensely unpopular. That was not part of any script, I presume. The decision by about half of the contestants to hail and hoist Miss Jamaica and declare her their Miss Universe was also surprising and shocking. Social media makes all of this visible to the world in ways that are hard to control. No editing out the live noise. No deleting the photos and videos of the spontaneous hoisting.

I imagine that a few people want to ask Donald Trump for his view of what happened, but I won’t wait.

I’ve seen speculation that, by citing Bob Marley and Usain Bolt as Jamaica’s major contribution to the world, our representative, Kaci Fennell, did her chances irreparable damage. I think that absolute hogwash.

If Miss Fennell had a few hours to spare, and an attentive and knowledgeable audience, I’m sure she could have talked about the relevance of Marcus Garvey, our strong principled stand for non-alignment issues, including opposing Apartheid and supporting Cuba by keeping diplomatic and economic ties. She could have talked about our unique position as the creators of six musical genres during the 20th century. Much more, too, for sure. But she didn’t.

I know many people have no idea about Bolt’s exploits–some Americans, for sure. I remember the blankness in the face of the couple I met in New York when I started about his Olympic and World Championship exploits.

Bob Marley? You mean that long-haired druggie, singing that dreary to reggae music? That’s another view of a person whom many Jamaicans regard as an icon.

But, I think she chose well. Talking generally about music and sports would have left the ignorant searching for a tangible example. Bolt and Marley fitted that.

I’m not going into the disaster of the first set of questions, which were posed in such a garbled fashion as to embarrass a drunk Scotsman on Burns Night.
The organizers could have invited one of our dance hall artistes to pose the questions in their best raw Patois. Imagine Gully Bop or Ninja Man at the mic. Whoooi!

Suggestion to the Trumpeteers, make sure your guests are coherent and clear speakers. Give us a chance to respect the power of great managers in action.

Was it the short hair? If so, then, small mindedness wins again. Not a first.

Miss Jamaica has taken the apparent dissing well. Stay on that high ground.

My view is that she’s got tons to gain by being hoisted up on the cloud of public opinion. She doesn’t have the Manhattan apartment, but she’s free to pick and choose how to use her new fame.

Jamaica has a new hero, crafted out of another case of seeming injustice, We are stronger for that. The upsurge of support for us and criticism of the result by media around the world is new but welcome.

People power is a cliche but it is real. The move to rally on social media is indicative of our age. #MissJamaicashould’vewon is just one reaction that people find is within their grasp. It’s not to be ignored.

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